Veeam v8 Install With NetApp Config

Veeam has released v8 of it’s Backup and Replication software. As a long time Veeam user this is a release I have been waiting for. Previously, Veeam had released support for storage snapshots on HP storage arrays, but with my environments being primarily NetApp over the last few years I wasn’t able to take advantage. Now in v8, we can restore and backup directly from snapshot. This speeds up the process and limits the impact on the Virtual Machines in the environment.

This guide walks you through a brand new installation of Veeam Backup & Replication v8 on Server 2012 and how to add your NetApp storage array as an object to browse existing snapshots. This is a high-level guide and in the future I’ll do a more in-depth backup/restore from Storage. For my guide on installing Veeam v7 with Windows 2012 R2 Data Deduplication, click here.

If you’re not interested in a custom SQL Express installation as well, pick up the guide at step 15. Steps 1-15 show how to install SQL Express to the secondary drive to prevent growing databases from affecting the main OS partition.


1. Dedicated server for installing Veeam
2. License file for Veeam (copied out to the server)
3. Latest version of Veeam v8 downloaded and mounted on the server (the installer is in an .ISO)
4. A service account for running the Veeam services (Optional, but my preferred method)
5. Username/password with admin rights to vCenter
6. Username/password for NetApp array (for this post I’ll be using the ‘root’ account)


1. Right click the DVD drive and click “Open”
2. Navigate to Redistr -> x64. Locate SQLEXPRx64.exe, right click and choose “Run as administrator”
3. Click “Yes” to run the installer if prompted
4. Under the “Installation” section, click “New SQL Server stand-alone installation”
5. Click the check box for “I accept the license terms” and decide if you want to send feature usage data to Microsoft then click “Next”
6. Ensure the check box for “Include SQL Server product updates” is checked and click “Next”
7. Updates and setup files will install…
8. Choose the features to install (Database Engine Services is the only thing required). Choose the install directory (I always choose the secondary drive of the machine and click “Next”
9. Choose a name for the instance or leave as default (SQLExpress), choose the instance root directory (secondary drive again) and click “Next”
10. Enter a service account for running the SQL DB engine (or leave it as local system) and click “Next”
11. Choose “Mixed mode” for the authentication type then enter a password for the “sa” account (Immediately save this password somewhere). Choose the groups/users that will be SQL Server administrators

a. Be default, only users/groups added here will have access to the Veeam console. If you don’t want to grant permissions to the SQL instance, you can grant access to these users/groups for the Veeam database after it has been created

12. Click on the “Data Directories” tab and ensure all the directories are pointing to the secondary drive and click “Next”
13. Choose whether to send error reports and click “Next” and the installation will begin
14. Once the installation completes, click “Close”
15. Close the “SQL Server Installation Center” window. Navigate back to the root of the DVD drive. Right click on “Setup.exe” and choose “Run as administrator”
16. Click “Yes” to run the installer if prompted
17. Click “install” for “Veeam Backup & Replication”
18. Click “Next”
19. Read and accept the license terms and click “Next”
20. Click “Browse” and locate your license file then click “Next”
21. Choose the features to install and the install directory then click “Next”

a. To install to a different location (like a secondary drive), the folders need to be created ahead of time

22. If any features are missing, click “Install”
23. Once the system configuration check passes, click “Next”
24. Review the default configuration and if no changes need to be made, click “Install”
25. Once the install completes, click “Finish”
26. Close the setup window and restart the server
27. After the server finishes rebooting, login and view the services to ensure the Veeam and SQL services that are “Automatic” have started
28. Open “Veeam Backup & Replication”
29. Click “Managed servers” on the left side and then click “VMware vSphere”
30. Enter the name or IP of the vCenter Server and click “Next”
31. Click the “Add” button and then enter the username/password of an account with permissions on the vCenter server. Click “OK” then click “Next”
32. Click “Finish”
33. To add your NetApp storage systems to Veeam, click on “Storage Infrastructure” and then click the “Add Storage” button
34. Click “NetApp Data ONTAP”
35. Enter the Name or IP of the storage system and click “Next”
36. Click “Add” to add credentials to connect to the NetApp then choose the protocol and port. Click “Next”
37. If the name/IP and credentials work, click finish and discovery of VMs and LUNs/Volumes will begin.
38. Once storage and VMs have been discovered, click “Close”
39. In the “Storage Infrastructure” view, expand “NetApp”, then the storage system. Choose a volume with virtual machines and current volume snapshots. Expand the volume, choose a snapshot and see what VMs are inside.

a. From this view you can delete existing snapshots, create new storage snapshots, and rescan the volume for new snapshots. At the VM-level, you can instantly recover the VM from snapshot, restore guest-OS files, and even restore objects from Active Directory, Exchange, SQL or SharePoint.

40. Click on “Backup & Replication” then expand “Backups” and click on “Storage snapshots.” You’ll see a list of all the volumes that have snapshots, what VM’s are in those snapshots, and how many restore points are available.

This is the basics of installing Veeam v8 and connecting to your vCenter Server and NetApp Storage. The process is incredibly simple and like every else from Veeam it just works. In the future I intend to add more restore scenarios such as application item recovery and VM recovery from storage snapshots.

Veeam v8 Install With NetApp Config

Performing Tegile System Upgrade

One of the more nerve-racking tasks as a storage admin is performing upgrades to your storage arrays. Through the years I’ve done a few upgrades to my NetApps and even when following directions on how to do it, I still worry that something isn’t going to go right and I’ll be left restoring a lot of data. I don’t exactly love working in the CLI either which adds to the nerves.

While working with this Tegile HA2400 we had a software update available ( to and it seemed like a great time to document this process. Software updates are done through the web interface and are done in just a few clicks on each controller. With failovers that allow for minimal interruption, I was able to perform this upgrade towards the end of the working day and we never had any application interruptions.

Below are the steps to peform this system upgrade.

1. If running in Active/Passive, login to the web interface of the passive Zebi node (default credentials are admin/tegile)
2. Verify that it’s the passive node by viewing the available pools. If there are no pools running on this node, you will only see “Zebi System” as the pool name
3. Click on “Settings” then “Administration”
4. On the left side, click “System Upgrade”
5. Click the link for “Check for Upgrades”
6. If there are any available updates, they will appear next to “Update Available”
7. Click the “Upgrade” button, click “Upgrade Local” and then click “OK” to confirm upgrading to the latest version
8. The installation will begin and show the status of the tasks it is performing followed by a notification that the node is rebooting.
9. After the node has rebooted, log back in to the web interface
10. Click on the Node name in the top right corner to verify the new version is running
11. Click the Flag icon in the top right and then the “ACK” button for the upgrade events that are generated.
12. Click on the Node name again and then click “Go to peer node” (this will open a new tab to connect to the other node in the cluster)
13. Click on “Settings” and then “HA”
14. Click “Switch Over All Resources” and click “OK” to confirm
15. Once you receive this message on controller A, all resources have been migrated
16. Click on “Settings” then “Administration”
17. Click on “System Upgrade” and then ensure that the “Update Available” version matches the version applied to the partner node
18. Click the “Upgrade” button, then click “Upgrade Local” (not that it recognizes the peer has already been upgraded) and click “OK”
19. The current task status will display just as before and then you’ll be notified once the node is rebooting just as before
20. After the reboot, log back in to the web interface and click the node in the top right corner to verify the version
21. Click on “Settings” and then “HA”
22. After the last upgrade, all the resources sitting on Controller B moved back to Controller A and now Controller B shows standby

That is all there is to it. The whole process from start to finish was under 15 minutes (I think closer to 10 if I didn’t screenshot the whole process). The steps for an active/active setup would be essentially the same, but you would move all the resources off one controller and on to the other prior to performing the first upgrade. Interestingly, despite not having auto failback enabled (Settings -> HA -> Advanced Options) after the upgrade completed all the resources that were on controller B moved back to controller A. During the next upgrade I will see if that happens again or was just a fluke this time around. I might even do that upgrade with a heavier load on the box just to see what happens.


Performing Tegile System Upgrade

Deploy NetApp OnCommand Balance 4.2

OnCommand Balance is a virtual appliance deployed within vCenter that allows you to monitor the health of your VMware environment at the Virtual Machine, vCenter and Storage level. Having a single place that displays end-to-end performance allows you to spend less time troubleshooting performance issues and trying to correlate data and address potential issues in your environment.

I’ve been using OnCommand Balance (formerly OnCommand Insight Balance) for a few years now and it has saved countless hours finding issues in the environment. We’ve had historical data available to look at growth and performance trends, as well as increased demand on individual servers after code releases/updates. Having access to the information within the VMs (such as drive space filling up) also makes this an invaluable tool.

The following documentation will take you through the deployment process of the Virtual Appliance and initial setup. You will go through adding your vCenter hosts, storage controllers, creating saved credentials, connecting to Active Directory for authentication and provision a Windows proxy service for monitoring Windows Servers.

1. A user account with appropriate permissions to vCenter for OnCommand Balance to use
2. A domain account with permissions to access all monitored Windows machines (preferrably a Domain Admin account)
3. A separate Windows Server/VM that will be used as the Proxy service to monitor Windows machines
a. Must have latest version of Java 6 installed and User Account Control disabled
4. Username/password for the NetApps that will be monitored

1. Download the latest version of OnCommand Balance (4.2) for this writing from the NetApp website
2. Connect to the vSphere web interface, click on “vCenter”, “Hosts and Clusters”, expand the Datacenter, and click on the Cluster/Host that will host OnCommand Balance. Right click and choose “Deploy OVF Template”
3. Click “Local file” and then “Browse”
4. Locate the OnCommand Balance OVA and click “Open” then click “Next”
5. Review the details of the OVF then click “Next”
6. Accept the EULA then click “Next”
7. Give the appliance a name and choose the folder location of the appliance (if any) and click “Next”
8. Set the virtual disk format (I prefer Thin since one of the drives is 220GB) and choose the datastore. Click “Next”
9. Choose the appropriate network and then click “Next”
10. Review the settings then click “Finish”
11. After deployment completes, locate the appliance, right click and choose “Power On”
12. Open the console of the VM (Right-click and choose “Open Console”) where you’ll see this countdown to install VMware tools prior to configuring the Balance virtual appliance (If you miss your chance to do this at this point, I was unable to install VMware tools at all on the appliance)
13. Right-click on the VM, go to “All vCenter Actions”, then “Guest OS” and then click “Install VMware Tools”
14. After the VMware tools dialog box is displayed, click “Mount”
15. The Balance virtual appliance should recognize VMware tools ISO has been mounted and proceed with the installation
16. After VMware tools install completes, press “y” then enter to configure static Network connection for the management interface
17. Enter the following information:

a. Host name
b. Host IP address
c. Netmask
d. Gateway
e. Primary DNS address
f. Secondary DNS address
g. Search domains

18. Review the settings and then press “y” and enter if everything is correct
19. Default OnCommand Balance console login is netapp/netapp. Login to the console
20. After a few minutes (5-10) the web service will be up and running. Connect to the https://IPofAppliance/bp to begin configuration
21. Enter the name of your organization and click “Continue”
22. Choose if you want to participate in AutoSupport and click “Submit”
23. Enter the time zone, NTP Server address, the address of the primary Balance admin (preferably a distribution group), and the SMTP server address. Click “Continue” (You can choose to change the password at this time)
24. Sit around and wait a couple minutes…
25. A blank screen may appear during this time, but eventually should take you to the OnCommand Balance login page. Login with the default credentials of admin/password or whatever password was set in step 23.
26. Click the link for “Configure you storage arrays & appliances”
27. Choose the type of storage (NetApp FAS in this case), enter the management address for one of the nodes, Enter the name of the filer, enter the credentials (root in my case) and enter a nickname of these credentials as they can be modified later on during password changes. Click “Save”
28. Even though DNS is configured correctly, I usually receive this error about the other filer of this HA system not being resolvable. Click “Enter IP address instead” and then enter the IP of the other filer and click “Resolve”
29. Click the “Refresh” link on the right side of the page a few times until “Discovery Collection” status changes to “OK”
30. Click the “Add storage system” button to add additional storage arrays (Including the HA partners). Click on “Dashboard” then choose “Configure your vCenter Server”
31. Enter the FQDN/IP Address of the vCenter server. Click “Add new” next to Credentials to add the credentials for the vCenter server
32. Enter the username, password, and nickname for these credentials. Click “Next”
33. Choose what you want monitored (though I can’t imagine why you’d choose not to monitor everything) and click “Save”
34. Click the “refresh” link until “Discovery Collection” status changes to “OK”
35. Click “Add vCenter Server” button to add any additional vCenter servers. Otherwise, hover over “Discovery” and choose “Credentials”
36. To monitor the OS’s of your VMs and physical servers, you can add those credentials on this page. I’ll add domain admin credentials for monitoring my Windows domain VMs. Click “Add credentials” button
37. Choose the login method, login name (domain\username), password, nickname for the credentials, and a description. Click “Save”
38. Once added they will appear on this screen
39. Hover over “Discovery” and choose “Proxies”
40. A proxy is required to monitor the guest OS status of Windows VMs and Physical servers. This proxy runs on a windows server. Once you’ve determined (or built) the appropriate server for the proxy, enter it’s FQDN or IP address and click “Continue”. Much like the picture below says, UAC MUST be disabled. You’ll beat your head against the wall for hours trying to figure out why it fails without that.
41. Download and install the latest 32-bit Java 6 runtime on this proxy server. Then navigate to the link listed on that proxy VM to begin the installation
42. Once the Balance Proxy Installer screen appears, click “Next”
43. Locate the folder path for the 32-bit java install and click “Next”
44. Enter an admin account for the service to be run under. Check the box for “Start service immediately after install” and click “Next”
45. Select any additional components you might need for other vendors and click “Next”
46. Review the information and click “Install”
47. Click “Finish”
48. Back at the Balance web interface, click “Validate proxy setup” and if successful, click “Continue”
49. Hover over “Discovery” and click on “Servers”
50. Click the link on the right side for “Unmonitored Servers”
51. Click the link next the vCenter server for “# guests are not being monitored”
52. Check the box next to the VMs you wish to monitor, choose your Credentials from the dropdown box in the center and click “Monitor guest(s)”
53. Hover over “Admin” and choose “Configuration”
54. Click “Email”. In here you can set authentication for your SMTP server, choose the “From” address for Balance emails. Click “Enable alerts” and then check all the boxes for Critical, Warning, and all categories (I prefer as many alerts as I can get). Click “Update”
55. Click on “Active Directory” and click the check box for “Enable Active Directory”
56. Enter the IP/hostname of your AD server, enter the Distinguished name of the account used to search Active Directory, and enter the password for that account. Click “Test”
57. Once successful, enter the Distinguished Name of the of the OU for the user/group that will have access to login. Enter the Distinguished name of the Group that will be able to login. Enter “sAMAccount” for the search attribute. Click “Update”
58. Hover over “Admin” and click “Users”
59. Click “Add User”
60. Change “Authentication” to “Active Directory”. Enter the username and click “Lookup”. If successfully, configured, it should populate the e-mail address. Choose the appropriate user type (Admin or User) and click “Save”

You’re all setup and ready to let OnCommand Balance start collecting data in your environment. You start to receive some information within about 30 minutes, but after 3-5 days you start to get a better understanding of what is going on in your environment and have more useful metrics.

Deploy NetApp OnCommand Balance 4.2

Tegile NFS Datastore Management in vCenter

As the primary VMware and storage admin, I try to minimize the number of tools I have to use to accomplish my tasks. When it comes to provisioning and managing volumes for VMware, I prefer to do it all from within the vSphere if possible. The VSC console for my NetApp filers has saved a lot of time over the years, but as we continue to explore our Tegile array we can see what their software has to offer.

My last post was about registering the Tegile plugin with vCenter to have this functionality available in the vSphere client. This post goes into the basic administration of NFS volumes from within the vSphere client.

1. Credentials to the Tegile web interface (default is admin/tegile)
2. Registered the Tegile plugin on your vCenter server. Click here for those steps.

1. Login to the vSphere thick client then click on “Home” and choose “Tegile Management” under “Solutions and Applications”
2. Proceed through any security warnings and login to the Tegile interface
3. On the left you’ll see a list of all the datastores on the Tegile that have been mounted on the ESXi hosts in this vCenter. Towards the bottom, click on “Add Datastore”
4. Enter the following information and click “Create”

a.Name: Name of the datastore
b. Type: Whether block or file based (SAN or NAS)
c. Protocol: NFS, iSCSI
d. Quota: Check this box to set a max size of the volume
e. ESX/ESXi Server (Version): Check the hosts that this datastore will be provisioned to
f. Pool: The disk pool for this datastore (if multiple are available)
g. Project: The project that this datastore will be associated with
h. Purpose: The type of workload hosted on this datastore (important for block size assignment)
i. Zebi Floating IP Address: The IP each ESXi host will connect to

5. Once the operation is complete, click “OK”
6. The new datastore has been created and mounted and appears in the list of Zebi datastores
7. Click the “More Details” button for the newly created datastore to see all the details of this volume
8. In order to resize this volume, click the “resize” button

a. Check the box for “New Share Quota” and enter the new size and press “Submit”

9. This view will refresh and the new size will be reflected
10. I have moved a virtual machine into this datastore to test the snapshot function with quiesce enabled. Click the “Snapshot” button for the datastore
11. Enter the name of the snapshot, change “Quiesce” to “on” and click “Create”
12. You’ll receive a message that snapshot creation has been triggered. Click “OK”

a. A new task will be created to snapshot all VMs that are in that datastore

13. Once the task to remove the virtual machine snapshot completes, click the “Refresh” button on the snapshot screen to see the new snapshot
14. To delete the snapshot, check the box to the snapshot and press the “Delete” button

a. Click “Yes” to confirm deletion
b. After this box disappears the snapshot is deleted

i. *UPDATED 10/9/14* There was a bug in version of the Zebi software that stopped the confirmation box was going away after the snapshot deletion completed. Clicking “No” would allow you to return to the snapshot list without any errors. In version this has been fixed and now the confirmation box disappears after the snapshot deletion completes.

Those are the basic functions you can perform from within the plugin. In a future release I would like to see the ability to create full snapshot schedules from the plugin. Since I am the one who is responsible for VMware and storage in our environment it’s simple for me to create the schedule on the web interface of the Tegile array, but that is not always the case. Another function I would like to see is mounting existing datastores on new hosts without having to go through the “Add Storage” process in vCenter for each host.

I’m confident the functionality will get there and I’ll continue to build my list of feature requests for the Tegile team.

Tegile NFS Datastore Management in vCenter

Register vCenter Server on Tegile

After 7 years of NetApp administration and implementation I have started looking for a new storage vendor that can “do it all” like NetApp has been able to do. Protocol support is a big deal in each of the environments I’ve worked in, but performance (IOPs and low-latency) are 2 things my existing NetApps haven’t been able to provide. The idea of adding capacity just to add performance is an antiquated way of thinking and NetApp just hasn’t been able to keep up with the evolving storage market.

I am starting a short series on Tegile setup and administration. Tegile came to us a couple of months ago and has impressed us from the very first conversation and all throughout our sizing and implementation. The box is simple to setup and administer and its performance is crushing our current NetApp.

This guide walks you through connecting the Tegile array to your vCenter server, installing the NFS VAAI Plugin, and setting the Tegile recommended values on the ESXi hosts. Once this is completed, you’ll be able to provision new volumes, resize existing volumes, create VM-aware storage snapshots as well as view storage performance of your VMs all from within the vSphere client.

1. Admin credentials to the Tegile and vCenter server
2. Dedicated service account in vCenter (I created an account called “ZebiAdmin”)
3. Root password for the ESXi hosts (required to set recommended values)


1. Connect to the web interface of the storage array and login with Admin credentials

a. Default username: admin
b. Default password: tegile

2. Click on “Settings” then choose “App-Aware”
3. Click “Add vCenter/ESXi Host” towards the bottom
4. Enter the following information:

a. Host Name/IP address: Host name or IP of the vCenter server
b. Username: User account with admin access to vCenter
c. Password: Password for user account
d. Enable Quiesce: This needs to be checked if quiescing will be used at all (a VMware snapshot is taken during thestorage snapshot process for OS consistency). Can be toggled per snapshot job

5. Click “Test” to see if the connection is successful. If it is, the “Save” button will turn solid blue and can be clicked
6. Click “OK” to confirm enabling of quiesce on VMware
7. Once saved, click the green “Register” button to add the Tegile plugin to vCenter
8. Once the registration is successful, click “OK”
9. Login to the vSphere thick client (not the web client). Click the “Home” button then click on “Tegile Management” under “Solutions and Applications” (Click yes to proceed through any certificate warnings)
10. Login to the Tegile web interface (Likely the same username and password as in step 1)
11. In this interface you’ll see a list of Datastores on the Tegile that are mounted on your ESXi hosts as well as real-time stats of your array, datastores, and VMs.
12. Click on “ESX Settings”
13. Select all the ESXi hosts and then click the Green Arrow icon to install/upgrade the VAAI NFS plugin on these hosts
14. After the install completes (may take 2-3 minutes), click the “Configuration” button for each host
15. Login to the ESXi host (likely “root” credentials)

a. Click “Yes” to enable SSH on this host if it isn’t already enabled

16. NFS.MaxQueueDepth should be set to “32” and the rules for iSCSI and FC can be installed in this location. Click “Save” to enable these changes

17. After the NFS VAAI plugin has been installed and settings saved, reboot the host. Repeat for each host in vCenter.

a. The settings changes are immediate, but the NFS VAAI plugin requires a host reboot


The process is simple and straight forward. This same process on the NetApp requires the Virtual Storage Console plugin to be installed on a separate server and configured then registered on the vCenter side with much more configuration. Also, installing the NetApp NFS VAAI plugin on the hosts is done through vCenter Update Manager and has been downloaded separately from the NetApp support site. That being said, the Tegile solution is lacking some of the polish that NetApp provides. I would like to see recommended values of the ESXi hosts set all at once, as opposed to one host at a time. In addition, I’d like the Tegile to change NFS.MaxVolumes default value from 8 to something much higher like the NetApp (256).

Register vCenter Server on Tegile

Veeam 7.0 Install on Windows 2012

Veeam Backup & Replication is one of my favorite piece of software I get to work with. I’ve been working with B&R since 2010 (v5) and  it has always been easy to install, easy to configure, and quick to start taking backups and protecting my environment. And that is just the software, the company itself is even better. Their support forums are full of employees and users that are knowledgeable and quick to help. The best way to describe Veeam is a company that is on your side as an Administrator. They listen to their community, their users, their customers and are developing solutions that make our jobs easier.

The following guide walks you through installing SQL Express, Veeam, connecting to vCenter 5.5 and configuring deduplication for a secondary drive on Windows Server 2012 R2.  I have a preference for installing all software to a secondary drive instead of the OS (C:\) drive so this documentation shows how to install each component to that secondary drive in the event you have the same preference as me.

Veeam’s site contains best practices regarding backup types, sizing of your Veeam server, deduplication recommendations, and everything else that goes into the planning of your Veeam Backup & Replication deployment. This guide is more just to show how to configure the components and an example of what I’m seeing for deduplication rates.


1. Windows Server 2012 R2 patched, joined to domain, with 2 additional drives (one for Veeam to be installed on and the other for backup data)
2. A user or group defined for Veeam administrators (required when doing a standalone SQL Express install in order to use Veeam, the service account used to run veeam must be a member of this group or added as a SQL Administrator in step 8)
3. A domain user account with admin rights to the vCenter server
4. Mount the Veeam B&R ISO
5. Turn off User Account Control (SQL Express install will fail without this)

1. Open “This PC”, located the Veeam disc, right click and choose “Open”
2. Browse to “Redistr\x64”, locate and double-click on “SQLEXPR_x64_ENU.exe”
3. Once the “SQL Server Installation Center” windows appears, click on “New installation or add features to an existing installation”
4. Accept the license terms and click “Next”
5. After Setup Support Files are loaded the SQL Server 2008 R2 Setup window will appear. Choose the features you’ll need (just Database Engine Services usually), change the Directories to the secondary drive (D:\ for this writing) and click “Next”
6. Enter the name of the instance and change the root directory to the secondary drive and click “Next”
7. You can run the SQL database engine as Network Service, but I prefer running as a named service account. Enter the domain\username, password, and click “Next”
8. Choose “Mixed Mode” for authentication type. Enter the “sa” password and immediately save it somewhere.

  • a. For “SQL Server administrators”, only users/groups added here will be able to open and run Veeam. Add all users that will need to access Veeam or create a group.
  • b. Click “Data Directories” tab and ensure all the directories are pointing to the secondary drive and click “Next” (For organization I prefer to create folders for each file, but it isn’t necessary)

9. Choose if you want to send error reports to Microsoft and click “Next”

  • a. Install will now begin to run

10. Once Installation completes, click “Close”
11. Navigate back to the root of the disc drive then locate and run “Setup.exe”
12. Click on install for “Veeam Backup & Replication”
13. Click “Next” through the initial setup screen
14. Read and accept the license agreement and click “Next”
15. If you have a license key add it now, otherwise click “Next”
16. Choose the program features to install. Click “Browse” button to change the installation to the secondary drive (you will have to make a new Folder name “Veeam” followed by “Backup and Replication” inside of it). Click “OK” then click “Next”
17. If any of the components that are required show a status of “Failed”, click the “Install” button

  • a. Once the installation completes the status will change to “Passed” then click “Next”

18. Enter the domain\username and password of the account Veeam will use to access vCenter and click “Next”

  • a. This user should be a local administrator on the server running Veeam or you’ll receive this message

19. Choose “Use existing instance of SQL Server”, select the Server\Instance and then enter a name for the Veeam database. Click “Next”

  • a. If the domain\veeam account isn’t in the Veeam Admins group, you will receive the following error that the user account “lacks CREATE ANY DATABASE permission”

20. Note the ports for Backup service and Catalog service and click “Next”
21. Change the “vPower NFS” directory to the secondary drive by clicking “Browse”, then navigate to the D:\Program Files\Veeam\Backup and Replication” then create a new folder inside named “NfsDatastore” and click “OK”.

  • a. For Guest file system catalog, click Browse and create a new folder named “VBRCatalog” under the D:\ drive. Click OK then “Next”

22. Review the configuration and then click “Install”
23. Once installation completes, click “Finish”
24. Now that Veeam is installed, let’s upgrade it to the latest patch. On Veeam’s website, download the latest patch for the version you’re running (Patch 4 for this writing) and copy it out to the server running Veeam.
25. Run the executable for this patch
26. Click “Next” through the first screen of the patch wizard
27. Click “Install” to begin the installation
28. Once the patch is installed, click “Finish”
29. Now that Veeam is installed and fully patched, locate Veeam Backup & Replication and open
30. You will receive a message about components that need to be updated (vPower NFS, Transports, Installer, etc). Click the check box next to the server and click “Next”
31. Click “Finish” once the components have been updated
32. Click the menu button and then click on “Options”
33. Click the check box for “Enable e-mail notification” and then enter your SMTP server, from email and to email. Click “OK”
34. Click on “Virtual Machines” towards the lower-left of the window and click “Add Server”
35. Click on your Server type (VMware vSphere for this writing)
36. Enter the name or IP of the vCenter server and click “Next”
37. For credentials, click “Add” then enter the domain\username and password for the Veeam account used to connect to vCenter. Click “OK” then click “Next”
38. Once the server has been added, click “Finish”
39. By default, the folder all VM backups are stored in is “C:\backup”. To change this before you create any backup jobs is to click on “Backup Infrastructure” towards the lower left of the window then click on “Backup Repositories”
40. Click the “Add Repository” button towards the top-left
41. Name your Backup Repository and click “Next”
42. Choose the type of repository (Microsoft Windows server) and click “Next”
43. Click the “Populate” button then select the backup drive and click “Next”
44. Enter the folder name (I took the default of D:\Backups) and click the populate button to see the capacity and free space of the drive. Limit the max concurrent tasks and/or data ingestion rate and click “Next”
45. Ensure vPower NFS is enabled and click “Next”
46. Review the settings and click “Next”
47. Once it completes, click “Finish”
48. Once the new repository appears, click the Menu button in the top-left corner and then click “Configuration Backup”
49. Change the Backup repository to the newly created repository and click “OK”
50. Right click on the “Default Backup Repository” and click “Remove” and click “Yes” to confirm delete
51. Now that a new repository is created, we need to enable deduplication on that folder. Open Server Manager, click on “Manage” then choose “Add Roles and Features”
52. Click “Next” through the “Before you begin” screen
53. Choose “Role-based or feature-based installation” and click “Next”
54. Choose “Select a server from the server pool” and select the current server then click “Next”
55. Expand “File and Storage Services”, then “File and iSCSI Services” and then check the box next to “Data Deduplication” and click “Next”
56. Click “Next” through “Features”
57. Click “Install”
58. Once installation is complete, click “Close”
59. Back in “Server Manager”, click on “File and Storage Services”
60. Click on “Volumes”, right-click the drive that we’ll be enabling dedupe for and choose “Configure Data Deduplication”
61. Set data deduplication from “Disabled” to “General purpose file server”, change “Deduplicate files older than (in days)” to 0.

  • a. To exclude folders from being deduped on that disk, click the “Add” button, expand the “Z:\” drive, and select each folder to prevent deduplication. In our setup, only backups are going to the Z:\ drive so we’ll skip this
  • b. Click “Set Deduplication Schedule” and then check the box for “Enable throughput optimization”. You will set the schedule for when dedupe runs. This should run when your backups are NOT running. My backups run OUTSIDE business hours, so dedupe should run DURING business hours. Click “OK” when finished and “OK” again

Now that Veeam is setup and connected to vCenter and we have a backup repository created with dedupe enabled, let’s take a look and see what kind of savings we get when we take our backups. One thing to note is that you won’t see much dedupe savings on a single backup file, but on a long backup chain and multiple backup jobs is where the real savings starts to come into play.

I have configured backups of 2 of my Exchange 2013 servers to run every 6 hours and keep 28 restore points (7 days). This backup job is set to “Reverse incremental” and Veeam is performing inline dedupe, compression set to “Optimal” and optimized for “Local target”. My first full backup was 36.3GB. Over the next 3 days, I have taken 12 more backups for a total of 75.1GB.

After dedupe ran over the last 3 days, we see the size as 75.1GB, but Size on disk is only 10.5GB

This is where it gets a little interesting though. In powershell, running the command “Get-DedupStatus” only shows a savings of 14GB. I’m not sure which one is accurate, but even a savings of just 14GB  in one backup job is an improvement. Since Windows Server 2012 deduplication runs across all files on a volume, you will see increased savings for every new backup file that’s created for every job that writes to that backup repository.


Veeam 7.0 Install on Windows 2012

NetApp VSC 4.2.1 Install on vCenter 5.5

I’m open to change, usually. New technology, new releases, new features, new options; I just like new. Though I do like new there is some “new” I struggle to get behind and that “new” is the vSphere Web Client. Even though it has been around awhile, with vSphere 5.5 there are things you have to use the web client for in order to administer your VMs (assuming they’re Harware Version 10). As a man not quite ready to make the leap to full-blown Web Client administration (and how can you since you still need the thick client to run Update Manager), I decided to install NetApp’s Virtual Storage Console 4.2.1 so I can continue to perform NetApp administration in the vSphere thick client.

As the primary VMware and NetApp engineer, having one place to create, mount, and resize volumes is a time saver. Plus the ability to create volume-level snapshots that quiesce the guest operating systems of your VMs provides a quick, point-in-time recovery time for your infrastructure. The steps below show how to install and configure the VSC 4.2.1 plugin in vSphere 5.5 connecting to an HA-pair of NetApps running ONTAP 8.1.2 in 7-mode.


1. A server that will run the VSC service (I usually install it on the Windows Server that hosts the vCenter Service or Update Manager as there are no port conflicts)
2. A domain account with “Administrator” rights to vCenter and local administrator on the Windows Server (this account will run the VSC service)
3. Credentials for the NetApps (I use ‘root’ for this, but a new user can be created on the NetApps with appropriate permissions)



1. Run VSC-4.2.1-win64.exe as administrator
2. Click “Next”
3. Read through the “Shared Credentials” notes, click “I Understand” then click “Next”
4. Check the box for “Backup and Recovery” (if licensed) and click “Next”
5. Set the installation directory (I prefer to install to a non-OS drive) and click “Next”
6. Note the URL and click the “Install” button
7. When the installation completes click “Finish” and you should have a browser pop-up to the URL above
8. On the browser page, continue through any security warnings
9. Choose the IP of the local service the plugin will use to communicate with vCenter (This is the IP of the server you are installing VSC to)

  • a. Enter the IP of the vCenter server
  • b. Enter a service account username and password (this should not be your own credentials)
  • c. Click “Register”
  • d. You should see this message below if successful

10. On the server, go to “Start”, “Administrative Tools”, and click on “Services”
11. Locate the “Virtual Storage Console for VMware vSphere Server” service, right click and choose “Properties”
12. Click the “Log On” tab then click “This account”

  • a. Enter the account username and password used to connect to vCenter then click “OK”
  • b. Click “OK” for the message about granting Log On As A Service rights
  • c. Click “OK” about not taking affect until the service is restarted

13. Right-click on the service and click “Restart”
14. Login to the vSphere thick client to the vCenter server

  • a. You should receive a Security Warning pop up, click the box to install the certificate and click “Ignore”

15. Click “Plug-ins” then “Manage Plug-ins” at the top
16. Locate the “Virtual Storage Console” plugin, right click it and click “Enable” then click “Close”

17. Click the “Home” button towards the top left then click “NetApp” under “Solutions and Applications”

  • a. If you receive a Security Alert click “Yes” to proceed

18. Right-click on one of the storage controllers listed at the top and click “Modify Credentials”
19. Enter the management IP address, username (likely root) and password (try with SSL, but if it doesn’t work try without SSL) and click “OK”

  • a. Click “OK” for the controller privileges summary
  • b. Repeat for any additional Storage Controllers
  • c. Once completed this is what you should see

20. Click on “Provisioning and Cloning” towards to the bottom left
21. Click the link for “Storage controllers” and click the “Refresh” link towards the top right
22. Right click on one of the controllers and click “Resources”
23. Move the NFS/iSCSI network interface(s) to the right column, move any volumes that VMware will manage to the right column and move any aggregates to the right column to be managed as well. Click “Save” (The 10.32.22.x network is for management of the NetApp while the 192.168.10.x network is a private, non-routable network for NFS traffic. All volumes should be mounted on that network.)

  • a. Repeat for any other controllers


*The original documentation I posted showed changing the role in vCenter for the “netappvsc” user to “VSC Administrator” instead of just “Administrator”. Turns out this breaks the Virtual Storage Console. When you attempt to mount or provision datastores, you receive the following error; “HTTP ERROR 403. Problem accessing /kamino/index.html. Reason: Forbidden”

At this point you are ready to manage your NetApp filers from the vSphere thick client. By right-clicking on your cluster in vCenter you can provision volumes to all the hosts in a cluster saving so much time of provisioning a new volume and then mounting it one host at time. Too bad you can mount a volume that’s already been created at the cluster level; it can only be done one host at a time.

NetApp VSC 4.2.1 Install on vCenter 5.5